dollarstodonuts
dollarstodonuts:

theuppitynegras:

dynastylnoire:

nina-lovehall:

whitepeoplesaidwhat:

I’m so mad right now!!! “West coast panther”??? Fuck white people and F21

..
Excuse me?

ARE YOU ACTUALLY SERIOUS?!!!!!! REALLY?!!!
http://www.forever21.com/Product/Product.aspx?BR=f21&Category=top_graphic-tees&ProductID=2000061690&VariantID=

if I see a white girl in this bullshit they are getting a-town stomped straight up

This is the worst.

dollarstodonuts:

theuppitynegras:

dynastylnoire:

nina-lovehall:

whitepeoplesaidwhat:

I’m so mad right now!!! “West coast panther”??? Fuck white people and F21

..


Excuse me?

ARE YOU ACTUALLY SERIOUS?!!!!!! REALLY?!!!

http://www.forever21.com/Product/Product.aspx?BR=f21&Category=top_graphic-tees&ProductID=2000061690&VariantID=

if I see a white girl in this bullshit they are getting a-town stomped straight up

This is the worst.

shepherdsnotsheep

meowmaniaaa:

2brwngrls:

In her 30-year career, Portland-born photographer Carrie Mae Weems has collected a long succession of accolades and honors, with approximately 50 solo exhibitions around the world, honorary degrees from numerous institutions, and, most recently, a MacArthur Genius Grant. This year, Weems gets the distinctive honor of becoming the first African-American woman to have a retrospective at the Guggenheim — her first major exhibition at any New York museum, ever. It’s one of those honors that sits at an awkward intersection, both disappointing and profound. Disappointing because it has taken this long for the Guggenheim to recognize an African American’s work is such a capacity, and profound because Weems’s work in particular feels strangely appropriate in this space, at this time.

Carrie Mae Weems, "Untitled (Man and mirror)," from "Kitchen Table Series" (1990), gelatin silver print, 27 1/4 x 27 1/4 in (69.2 x 69.2 cm) (Collection of Eric and Liz Lefkofsky, promised gift to The Art Institute of Chicago) (© Carrie Mae Weems) (photo © The Art Institute of Chicago) (click to enlarge)

In the days since the debut of Weems’s exhibition (coupled with a beautifully edited catalogue from Yale University Press), there has been discussion not only about its historic significance, but also about the significance of how it’s situated within the Guggenheim itself. Curated by Kathryn E. Delmez and initially presented at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville (the Guggenheim is the final stop on a national tour), the original retrospective has been cut down extensively, with Weems’s moving exploration of Gullah culture, theSea Island Series,only excerpted, and other important works such asThe Hampton Project, which explores ties between African and Native Americans, cut out all together. And it’s true: the exhibit, split in loose chronological order between two of the museum’s Annex Level galleries, does somehow feel incomplete…

my latest article on the Carrie Mae Weems Guggenheim exhibit - check out the rest at the link!

- Z

so i saw this on saturday and i have a lot of love for cmw and a lot of feelings about the guggenheim and a lot of that is captured in this article